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LED vs. LCD TVs explained: Whats the difference? Professional

1 month ago   Freebies   Nelson   54 views

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LCD Monitors

Liquid crystal display technology works by blocking light. Specifically, an LCD is made of two pieces of polarized glass (also called substrate) that contain a liquid crystal material between them. A backlight creates light that passes through the first substrate. At the same time, electrical currents cause the liquid crystal molecules to align to allow varying levels of light to pass through to the second substrate and create the colors and images that you see.

Active and Passive Matrix Displays

Most LCD displays use active matrix technology. A thin film transistor (TFT) arranges tiny transistors and capacitors in a matrix on the glass of the display. To address a particular pixel, the proper row is switched on, and then a charge is sent down the correct column. Since all of the other rows that the column intersects are turned off, only the capacitor at the designated pixel receives a charge. The capacitor is able to hold the charge until the next refresh cycle.

The other type of LCD technology is passive matrix. This type of LCD display uses a grid of conductive metal to charge each pixel. Although they are less expensive to produce, passive matrix office monitors are rarely used today due to the technology's slow response time and imprecise voltage control compared to active matrix technology.

LCD displays offer super sharp pictures and great color. But do the pros outweigh the cons when it comes to LCD TV displays? Before deciding on a thumbs up or thumbs down, you should understand how an LCD display works.

Mechanics of an LCD display

The LCD consists of a large number of pixels, or picture elements, consisting of liquid crystal molecules held between two sets of transparent electrodes.

The liquid crystals react in predictable ways when the electrical charge running between those electrodes is changed — meaning they twist and move in ways that let different amounts (and colors) of light through the crystals. The LCD has a control system that translates your video signals into the proper charges for each electrode. A light source shines through the LCD panel and creates your picture.

When compared to the other type of flat-panel display (plasma), LCDs tend to be found on the smaller size of the spectrum. You’ll rarely find a plasma smart TV smaller than 42 inches, but you can find LCDs at sizes as small as 13 inches.

Benefits of LCD displays

LCD displays have some strong points when it comes to playing video:

Extremely high resolutions: LCDs can easily reach HDTV resolutions (in fact, most LCD displays do). You can find a 1080p-capable LCD display in all but the smallest sizes — while many plasma displays are still 720p.

Excellent color: LCDs offer exceptional reproduction of colors, with the potential for beautifully re-created colors across the spectrum. This differs from other flat-panel displays (such as plasma systems), which often tend to display certain colors inaccurately.

Great picture: The newest and most expensive LCDs use an LED (light emitting diode) instead of a traditional bulb for their light source. These LEDs produce a higher-quality picture because the LED itself emits a more natural (closer to daylight) light than a bulb (which tends to be yellowish, not true white).

Energy efficiency: LCD HDTVs are perhaps the greenest HDTVs. Compared to plasmas, LCD HDTVs use less electricity to run. You can probably expect to use about 30 percent less power for an LCD than for a similar-sized plasma.

PC monitor-capable: Most LCD television displays can also do double-duty as a gaming monitor, plugging directly into any PC with a standard PC video cable.

No burn-in: If you play a lot of video games, watch the stock ticker on MSNBC, or do other things with your display that involve a lot of static content (images that don’t change or move around) on a CRT display, you can end up with those images permanently burned into the phosphors on your LCD screen. Because LCDs use a separate backlight instead of creating their own light with phosphors, they are immune to this problem (plasmas are not, by the way).


 

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